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Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

  • 1.  Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 09-15-2021 10:55 AM
    Hi all,

    I was asked that since our Epson proofs could simulate an uncoated run if I could have a calibration set to my screen to do that. Photoshop is not a good proofing simulation for this. Any information would be helpful.

    ------------------------------
    Jason Wright
    Prepress Manager / G7 Color Professional
    Slate Group
    Lubbock TX
    (800) 794-5594
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 09-16-2021 01:48 AM
    Hi Jason,

    You've not said what your printing or proofing setups are, but the general solution is to use a suitable uncoated profile as your source and absolute colorimetric render intent to convert to your Epson profile. This is made explicit in the color management settings of any RIP and a little less so if printing from Photoshop to an Epson driver. 

    What is a "suitable" source profile for your purposes depends on press type/ink/screening and of course substrate type and color. 

    MIke


    Mike Strickler | MSP Graphic Services
    423 Aaron St. Suite E | Cotati, CA 94931 USA  | O: +1 707-321-7855
    www.mspgraphics.com








  • 3.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 09-16-2021 07:57 AM
    Accurate soft proofing requires several components to align for accuracy.
    They are:
    1) An AdobeRGB gamut monitor (to accurately represent the cyan simulatio)n
    2) A high bit display (12-16 bit depth, to produce the subtle transitions)
    3) A calibration routine which first produces the monitor firmware gross gray balance in high bit depth
    4) A calibration routine which then addresses the video card to produce the finely tuned gray balance
    5) Validation that the monitor can produce the target white point (D50 for highest quality displays). A corrected white point for those displays which can not achieve D50 accurately
    6) A brightness of 140 cd/m2 for viewing in room light
    7) A brightness of 120 cd/m2 for viewing in a proper darker viewing environment
    8) A contrast ratio which best matches your print condition (most modern displays are oriented more to video and online representation, than to the flatter print condition)
    9) A highly accurate monitor ICC profile
    10) The ability to emulate a GRACoL print condition, either in the monitor's utility or in the Photoshop View function.
    11) A desktop daylight viewing condition which best matches the above cited 120 cd/m2 or 140 cd/m2 monitor brightness

    Summary: All 11 points must agree, if print emulation is expected

    ------------------------------
    Jon Meyer

    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 09-16-2021 12:32 PM
    Sorry I misread you, thinking that you wanted to make a better hard proof. Disregard most of what I wrote. The advice below is pertinent as far as the (soft) proofing device is concerned. But you do still need to aim at the correct reference profile and rendering intent; otherwise you simply have an accurate view of the wrong target. Photoshop can do an excellent job of softproofing, in fact.

    Mike

    ------------------------------
    Mike Strickler
    MSP Graphic Services
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 09-17-2021 08:50 AM
    I hope this is helpful Bob Stokes at Abbott Communications Group

    Epson SureColor T-Series User's Guide
    Color Management Printing
    115
    Color Management
    Printing
    About Color Management
    Even when using the same image data, the original
    image and the displayed image may look different, and
    the printed results may look different to the image you
    see on the display. This occurs due to the difference in
    characteristics when input devices such as scanners
    and digital cameras capture colors as electronic data,
    and when output devices such as display screens and
    printers reproduce colors from the color data. The
    color management system is a means to adjust
    differences in color conversion characteristics among
    input and output devices. A color management system
    is included with operating systems such as Windows
    and Mac OS, in addition to image processing
    applications. Windows and OS X include the ICM and
    ColorSync color management systems, respectively.
    In a color management system, a color definition file
    called a "Profile" is used to perform color matching
    between devices. (This file is also called an ICC profile.)
    The profile of an input device is called an input profile
    (or source profile), and the profile of an output device,
    such as a printer, is called a printer profile (or output
    profile). A profile is prepared for each media type in
    this printer's driver.
    The color conversion areas by the input device and the
    color reproduction area by the output device differ. As
    a result, there are color areas that do not match even
    when performing color matching using a profile. In
    addition to specifying profiles, the color management
    system also specifies conversion conditions for areas
    where color matching failed as "intent". The name and
    type of intent vary depending on the color
    management system you are using.
    You cannot match the colors on the printed results and
    display by color management between the input device
    and the printer. To match both colors, you need to
    perform color management between the input device
    and the display as well.
    Color Management Print
    Settings
    You can perform color management printing using
    this printer's printer driver in the following two ways.
    Choose the best method according to the application
    you are using, the operating system environment, the
    aim of the print out, and so on.
    Setting color management with the applications
    This method is for printing from applications that
    support color management. All color management
    processes are carried out by the application's color
    management system. This method is useful when you
    want to obtain the same color management print
    results using a common application among different
    operating system environments.
    U"Setting color management with the applications"
    on page 116
    Setting color management with the printer driver
    The printer driver uses the operating system's color
    management system and carries out all color
    management processes. You can make color
    management settings in the printer driver using the
    following two methods.
    O Host ICM (Windows) / ColorSync (OS X)
    Set when printing from applications that support
    color management. This is effective in producing
    similar print results from different applications
    under the same operating systems.
    U"Color management printing by Host ICM
    (Windows)" on page 117
    U"Color management printing by ColorSync
    (OS X)" on page 118
    O Driver ICM (Windows only)
    This allows you to perform color management
    printing from applications that do not support
    color management.
    U"Color management printing by Driver ICM
    (Windows Only)" on page 119

    ------------------------------
    Bob Stokes
    General Manager
    Abbott Communications Group
    Maitland FL
    (407) 831-2999 x124
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 30 days ago
    Review document ISO 12646 on how to setup soft proofing. The aim points in the ISO document are different than what has been expressed on this forum.

    ------------------------------
    Dan Reid
    President/Color Consultant
    RPimaging, Inc.
    Tucson AZ
    (520) 355-2848
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Screen calibration/simulation for uncoated runs.

    Posted 13 days ago
    Edited by Jackson Liam 13 days ago
    All 11 points must agree, if print emulation is expected

    Accurate soft proofing requires several components to align for accuracy.

    They are:

    1) An AdobeRGB gamut monitor (to accurately represent the cyan simulatio)n

    2) A high bit display (12-16 bit depth, to produce the subtle transitions)

    3) A calibration routine which first produces the monitor firmware gross gray balance in high bit depth

    4) A calibration routine which then addresses the video card to produce the finely tuned gray balance

    5) Validation that the monitor can produce the target white point (D50 for highest quality displays).

    A corrected white point for those displays which can not achieve D50 accurately

    6) A brightness of 140 cd/m2 for viewing in room light

    7) A brightness of 120 cd/m2 for viewing in a proper darker viewing environment

    8) A contrast ratio which best matches your print condition (most modern displays are oriented more to video and online representation, than to the flatter print condition)

    9) A highly accurate monitor ICC profile

    10) The ability to emulate a GRACoL print condition, either in the monitor's utility or in the Photoshop View function.

    11) A desktop daylight viewing condition which best matches the above cited 120 cd/m2 or 140 cd/m2 monitor brightness
    ------------------------------
    Gordon Bullard & Company
    ------------------------------